Search
Basket Total £0.00 Plus Delivery £0.00
View basket Checkout
Garden Mints Garden Mints
E-mail a sales advisor Home Customer Services Your Account Help using our site Contact Us
SPECIAL SERVICES
INFORMATION


DELIVERY
To check whether we can deliver to your address, please enter your postcode and click Go.

 

 

Home > A Guide to Perfect Pruning


Pruning 1

 A Guide to Pruning Your Climbing Plants

 

 

All clematis that you

have planted new to

your garden will

need to be pruned

down to 30cm (12")

the first February/March

after planting. This

will give you a

strong healthy

climber and

encourage a bushy

multi-stemmed plant.  

 

 

                                          

                                           Prune 30cm above ground level above a set of strong buds.

 

 

Prune 2

 

 

Prune 1cm above a strong pair

of buds with a sharp and clean pair of secateurs

 

 

When, how and why? - Not complicated and the golden rule is 'Do NOT prune if it flowers before June!'

 

 

 

 

pixie

 

 

 

Growers have standardised the pruning of all clematis into three groups and just make sure you know before you buy which group it belongs to and it will reward you well

 

 

 

 

Group 1 - No Pruning -(Evergreen armandii, cirrhosa, and montanas, alpinas, macropetalas etc)

 

Evergreen Clematis 'Pixie' (as shown above) will NOT need to be pruned

 

These are varieties, which flower on the previous seasons growth, they all flower early in the season. These include alpinas, macropetalas, the Evergreens and montanas. No hard pruning is required other than  a good tidy up each year, removing any dead or weak stems after flowering in late May/June and tying the remainder to its support.  Plants that have made excessive growth can be pruned back hard at this time if you wan't to reduce size. This will prevent the montanas from getting out of control and will stop others from getting a woody structure at the base. Pruning these plants at other times of the year will result in fewer flowers but will rarely damage the plant.

 

light prune

 

Group 2 - Optional Pruning

 

This group consists of all early, large flowered hybrids, including double and semi-double varieties. Their main flowering period is May, June and September.  They should be left unpruned, but it is usual to remove dead or weak stems in February/March the remaining should be reduced to a strong pair of buds, a variation in the length of stems should result in flowers being more evenly spread along the length of the plant.

 

 

Group 3 - Hard Pruning

 

hard prune

Late large flowered hybrids, viticellas, texensis, herbaceous and species all fall into this group.  These produce flowers on the current seasons growth and should be reduced to two strong buds in February/March, this will normally be 12-18" from the ground.  Failure to prune these varieties may result in the plant becoming bare of leaves and flowers at the base.

 

Don't forget:

 

All clematis that you have planted new to your garden will need to be pruned down to 30cm (12") the first February/March after planting. This will give you a strong healthy climber and encourage a bushy multi-stemmed plant . 

 

 

What if i have an older clematis in my garden that has not been pruned each year and needs a bit of help?

 

You can rejuvenate an old, tired plant with a complete hard prune, carried out in two stages. First in late autumn, we would recommend partially pruning the clematis to waist height, tying in the remaining stems to avoid wind damage over the winter period. This partial pruning will encourage viable buds to form in the leaf joints low down on the stems which will then make the second stage, the final hard pruning (as above) in early spring more successful.

 

 

 

 pag1

pag2

compag3

 

climbing 1

climbing 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHERE TO GROW
Learn about the best places for your Garden Mints to flourish.
Full info
MINT IN COOKING
Great ideas for using mint in cooking.
Full info
MINT RECIPES
Wonderful recipes for cooking with mint
Full info
MEDICINAL AND COSMETIC USES
How mint is used in medicine and cosmetics
Full info
ANTI-CANCER MINT
The use of mint in ant-cancer trials.
Full info
FACTS AND FIGURES
A few interesting facts and figures !
Full info
HOW MANY MINTS?
Just how many different mint plants are there out there?
Full info
PLANT SIZE GUIDE
Our plant size guide illustrated for your ease of use.
Full info
LADYBIRD GUIDE
Read how you can look after ladybirds while looking after your garden.
Full info
CLIMBING PLANTS
A Guide to Planting
Full info
PRUNING CLIMBERS
A Guide to Pruning
Full info
CONTAINER GARDENING
A guide to Growing in Patio Containers
Full info

 

Secure payments by PayPal

 

 

Delivery Guide Press Wholesale Collection Service Terms & Conditions